natalie-portman-012.jpg
natalie-portman-006.jpg
natalie-portman-010.jpg
natalie-portman-004.jpg
natalie-portman-009.jpg
natalie-portman-007.jpg
natalie-portman-014.jpg
natalie-portman-003.jpg
natalie-portman-005.jpg
natalie-portman-011.jpg
natalie-portman-001.jpg
natalie-portman-008.jpg
natalie-portman-013.jpg
natalie-portman-002.jpg
natalie-portman-012.jpg
natalie-portman-006.jpg
natalie-portman-010.jpg
natalie-portman-004.jpg
Welcome to Natalie Portman Fan an upcoming fansite dedicated to the award winning actress. I’ll be posting updates here while working hard behind the scenes to bring you the best Natalie fan source. Be sure to follow us to keep up to date on the latest Natalie news, and track our progress. You can also follow us on Twitter to stay updated. I can’t wait for you to see everything we have in store for you!
Natalie Portman Fan
Coming Soon
Feel free to browse while the site is being built

Marvel just announced some amazing news at the San Diego Comic-Con!!

Natalie Portman is female Thor announced Thor 4 director Taika Waititi. She played Jane Foster in the first two Thor movies. Pic opens Fall 2021.

No surprise here at Marvel’s Comic-Con panel, but Taika Waititi was on hand to talk about Thor 4 along with Tessa Thompson who played Valkyrie in Thor Ragnarok along with Chris Hemsworth. Why no surprise? News broke earlier this week that Waititi was returning to Thor. He’s also here for FX’s What We Do In Shadows later tonight at the San Diego Convention Center. Thompson appeared earlier on HBO’s Westworld panel.

Valkyrie will be “re-investing in her people” and rebuilding Asgard said Thompson. “The love I feel for him is thunder,” said Thompson.

Waititi was reading one story line by Jason Aron called The Mighty Thor which is what the fourthquel will be based on. “That story line is incredible is full emotion, love and thunder and introduces for the first time female Thor,” said Waititi. Thompson and Hemsworth haven’t seen the script yet.

What’s happened to Thor posts Endgame? “He’s heading to the 7-11 for a little Netflix subscription and at this point he might be on the couch, who knows,” said Hemsworth.

Source: Deadline

The feature from the studio’s newly branded Disneynature label will debut on Disney+, the upcoming direct-to-consumer streaming service.

Natalie Portman will narrate the Disney feature film Dolphin Reef, to be released on Disney+, the studio’s upcoming streaming service.

Created by Disneynature, the new Disney-branded film label, and directed by Keith Scholey, the pic centers on Echo, a young Pacific bottlenose dolphin who can’t quite decide if it’s time to grow up and take on new responsibilities. That is, until he can’t resist the many adventures the ocean has to offer.

“Disneynature takes audiences to spectacular and remote places to share remarkable wildlife stories captured by our award-winning film crews,” Paul Baribault, vice president of Disneynature, said Monday in a statement.

Dolphin Reef will join the lineup on Disney+, which is set to launch Nov. 12 as a family-friendly service with an expansive library of programming, including the Disney classics 101 Dalmatians, Bambi, Fantasia, Mary Poppins, The Sword in the Stone, Steamboat Willie and Sleeping Beauty.

In addition to the some 7,500 TV episodes and 500 movies available, the platform will also be home to original programming including The Mandalorian, High School Musical: The Musical: The Series and the live-action remake of Lady and the Tramp.

Disney+ will also feature movies and shows from Disney, Pixar, Marvel, Lucasfilm and National Geographic.

Source: The Hollywood Reporter

STAR WARS prequels star Natalie Portman has opened up on fan backlash to the trilogy in a new interview.

The Phantom Menace, Attack of the Clones and Revenge of the Sith are widely considered by some fans to be the worst Star Wars films. And now prequel trilogy star Portman, who played Padme, has revealed what an effect that negativity had on her. Speaking with Empire, the 37-year-old said: “It was hard. It was a bummer because it felt like people were so excited about new ones and then to have people feel disappointed.”

Portman continued: “Also to be at an age that I didn’t really understand that’s kind of the nature of the beast.

“When something has that much anticipation it can almost only disappoint.

“With the perspective of time, it’s been re-evaluated by a lot of people who actually really love them now.

“There’s a very avid group of people who think they’re the best ones now! I don’t have enough to perspective to weigh in.”

Remaining positive, Portman added: “It’s definitely one of the most important things I’ve been part of. Important meaning things I’m most associated with.

“It’s the only time I’ve done three films from the same universe.

“But I think because I had worked a lot before and worked a lot after, there are many other things I’m associated with… It’s been meaningful to me and it’s very cool to be part of.”

Earlier this week The Phantom Menace celebrated its 20th anniversary at Star Wars Celebration, where Jar Jar Binks star Ahmed Best received a warm reception from fans.

Last year Best bravely shared how he had considered suicide following the criticisms against his character Jar Jar Binks.

Following great support for speaking out on his struggles then, the actor received huge fan appreciation upon arriving for The Phantom Menace panel.

Many chanted, “Ahmed! Ahmed! Ahmed!”, as he came on stage.

Best took his seat and said: “You guys are gonna make me tear up and I’m an unattractive crier.”

Source: Express

Shapeshifter Natalie Portman transitions from mother to crusader to centre stage actor and now a next chapter: a modern character study in resolve, intelligence and womanhood. Here, read the full cover story and see every picture from Vogue Australia’s April 2019 issue.

Natalie Portman is backstage in a dressing room amid the labyrinth of corridors under Melbourne’s opulent Regent Theatre. She is dressed in a bodice, and with her hair pulled back under the matching mesh head covering, her delicate features are accentuated. She looks in the mirror and dabs at her lips; hers is a classic beauty befitting a Hollywood movie star. Then she suddenly turns to the camera with a fierce stare, and in a flicker of her eyes Portman momentarily transforms into Nina, her disturbed ballet dancer in Black Swan, who in a moment of psychosis trashes a dressing room in a climactic scene. In fact, a dressing room is also the scene of a pivotal moment in Portman’s latest film Vox Lux, when her troubled and addictive pop star character Celeste has a mini meltdown prior to going on stage for a big comeback concert. I mention this observation later – same scenario, two different characters, eight years apart – and wonder if the dressing room has any particular meaning to Portman. Her face lights up: “Well spotted,” she smiles. “Those scenes were actually coincidentally filmed in the same venue, in the same dressing room!”

Earlier Portman had been running down a gilt-lined hallway in a diamanté bolero, acting out another scene. It reminded a crew member of her personification of Jackie Onassis in Jackie, which earned the actress critical praise for her uncanny take on the much-admired former US First Lady and style icon. “I could pretend to be her all day, she’s divine,” Portman purrs, before disappearing down the corridor again to ready for another shot.

The romanticism of the stage and theatre – her husband runs a dance company – seems a perfect setting for this movie star and her Vogue Australia cover shoot. Portman loves playing dress-ups and embodying new characters. She has carved a successful career out of it since she first appeared on screen at the age of 12 in Léon: The Professional in 1994. Her choices have led to her portraying interesting, complex women, many of whom became game-changers for the actress: Nina won her an Oscar, Jackie earned plaudits, Garden State (2004) indie cred, Closer her first Oscar nomination, even Queen Amidala was transformative, earning her a legion of Star Wars fans and bringing her to Australia for the first time. Portman spent several months living in Sydney in 2000 while Star Wars: Episode II and III were filmed simultaneously at Fox Studios. The period left an indelible memory on Portman, who has an eternal soft spot for our country.

Last year she returned with her family – husband Benjamin Millepied, a renowned French ballet dancer and choreographer, and their children Aleph, seven, and two-year-old Amalia – to attend the National Gallery of Victoria’s (NGV) Gala in Melbourne. There Portman marvelled at the Escher x Nendo: Between Two Worlds exhibition, as well as Indigenous art at the NGV’s Ian Potter Centre, while the family also ate their way through Melbourne’s award-winning restaurants and took in cultural experiences while enjoying a holiday.

“My family does not want to leave: they just love it here,” she says with a smile as we chat in the cafe of a new boutique Melbourne hotel. “This country is a dream. The people are so warm, so friendly, the food is unbelievable, the nature is astonishing. The culture’s incredible … I’m very admiring of this nation.”

Her son is now obsessed with the platypus, which he saw at the zoo, and the family have also became fans of Australian Rules Football, thanks to an introduction from Portman’s best friend from school, who is married to an Australian and lives in Melbourne. “She organised for us to go to a practice, which was so amazing. They were super-lovely and incredible athletes,” she says.

“And it’s so cool that there are women’s teams. So cool. They were saying that it’s made the men’s and the women’s leagues more popular. They’ve gotten more female fans and more male fans, which is so great. I wish we had that [in the US].”

Portman is passionate about gender equality. A day after President Trump’s inauguration in 2017, Portman, then heavily pregnant with her daughter, made an impassioned speech at the first Women’s March in Los Angeles:

“From the bottom of both hearts beating inside my miraculous female body, I want to thank our new president – you just started the revolution,” she said to resounding applause. Last year, soon after the Time’s Up movement to eradicate sexual harassment was officially launched, Portman returned to the dais at the 2018 Women’s March and revealed how she was sexualised as a 12-year-old after the debut of her first film, Léon: The Professional. Several weeks later she took her stance to the Oscars, highlighting the lack of inclusiveness in the best director category that she was presenting, brilliantly deadpanning: “And here are the all-male nominees.”

When we speak, Portman reflects on Time’s Up, and is circumspect about what she’s learnt, positing that closing the gender pay gap is the next phase of the revolution.

“It’s been really an incredible learning process, and a lot of new friendships and support systems have formed, and a network that we had never had. It was really surprising and amazing to me,” she says. “I think I was also surprised by how much I had accepted that was not okay, because of course it was a surprise to realise how many women had been affected by this, by many different perpetrators, and to many different extents, and how with all of it there is a spectrum of things that are not okay that we put up with on a regular basis. I think one thing that was so interesting … [was] I would hear people say: ‘Well, that’s not really harassment, that’s like a bad date, or we’ve all had that.’ Because we’ve all had that doesn’t mean it’s okay, it means it’s ubiquitous … that was really a revelation to me: that it’s not just a bad date or a bad boyfriend, that it is abusive and sexist, and we’ve been living in it, and not only that, but also the [iniquity of] hiring practices and pay.

“I mean, it’s all related, because it’s all about how we are valued, and I think we’ve internalised it, and become part of it. We’ve become complicit in the system because we internalised that.

“It was a real eye-opening of: ‘Wow, I’m part of this system. I’ve accepted this system. I’ve been complicit in this system’, not in the way of knowing someone’s getting abused and not talking about it, but complicit in the way of not actively revolting against it. It’s been quite a year.”

I ask if she is teaching both her daughter and son to become empowered, and she nods. “Yes, it’s absolutely different when you know you are raising a next generation, both male and female,” she says. “And also, of course being introduced to the ideas of gender fluidity where you’re like: ‘Oh, how do I not imprint this shit that I have imprinted on me? How do I not imprint that on my kids?’ I think we’re all grappling with it in different ways.”

It was after being inspired by the launch of Time’s Up that Portman finally joined Instagram, where she has since garnered over 3.6 million followers. She uses the social media platform to champion her many causes – activism, veganism, her various film projects and, of course, the arts, and regularly posts support for her husband’s company, the LA Dance Project. The couple met when Millepied worked as the ballet choreographer on Black Swan (2010). Millepied also acted as Portman’s personal coach of sorts for Vox Lux, helping his wife prepare her pop-star dance choreography at home.

“It was so fun,” she says of working with her husband again. “First of all, I don’t know how I would have done it without him, because he pretty much did it as a favour to me, because I had so little time before we started that I don’t think it would have been possible if we hadn’t been in the same home, to just able to fit in rehearsals whenever we had a moment. That was really, really fun, and then also, of course, he’s amazing, and also knows my leg strengths and weaknesses, so he knows how to work around what I can and can’t do.

“Then the dancers were incredible; they had all come off of Beyoncé’s tour. I mean, it took me a month of spending hours every day working on this stuff and they learned it like two days. It was really amazing. They were just the greatest women.”

Another bonus of Vox Lux was acting out her childhood dreams of being a pop star. The ambitious drama centres around a school massacre survivor who becomes a troubled international pop star derailed by fame. Australian singer Sia wrote the songs.

“It was a good time, being up there on stage and singing and dancing; I was definitely brought back to having that kid feeling of singing with my hairbrush in the mirror,” she says.

Portman then moved from the stage to space, starring as an astronaut in the yet to be released Lucy in the Sky – “she’s an astronaut who comes back to Earth … it’s a story about a woman who loses it”. Portman grins – this seems to be a recurring theme for her character choices.

“I feel like I’m getting to live out my childhood dreams through my roles: ballerina, singer, astronaut,” she quips: “It’s going to be my criteria now for choosing movies that I’m going to be playing – next I’ll be like a mermaid and a firewoman!”

Off-screen, Portman is multi-faceted, in no particular order: actor, mother, wife, activist, writer, director, producer, vegan. She is known for being an intellectual – she studied psychology at Harvard and in 2016 conducted a rather cerebral email correspondence with author Jonathan Safran Foer for a cover story in The New York Times’s T Magazine, which was mocked on the internet for its pretentiousness.

She later told The Cut of the exchange: “I am pretentious! So it’s good to be reminded. Sometimes, I get too serious or whatever. I don’t really mind. It was mainly funny.”

It was while producing a documentary based on Safran Foer’s book Eating Animals that Portman, who has been a practicing vegetarian since the age of nine, decided to turn completely vegan, eschewing eating or wearing any animal products.

“I was pregnant with my first child when I read Eating Animals and I then understood how sick [and polluting] our factory farming is in the United States.”

As she explains this I rather embarrassingly start to remove the leather jacket I am wearing, and she laughs sincerely: “Oh no, don’t worry, I’m very not judgmental. I hate when anyone pressures me on any of my choices.”

In person, Portman is polite, inquisitive and engaging – and despite being the most famous person in the room, will happily turn the conversation back on the person in front of her. And although she is seemingly serious and sometimes intense, there is still a very light-hearted, girlie side to the actress, who excitedly waxes lyrical about the benefits of working with the house of Dior – she has been the face of Miss Dior perfume since 2010.

“It’s been really incredible getting to work with Dior. I’ve had amazing experiences and I’m kind of obsessed with flowers and scent, so to get to visit the rose fields in Grasse and meet with their nose, François Demachy [Dior perfumer creator], and see how it gets created is just a total fantasy dream,” she says.

“And then, of course, I get to wear the clothes. It’s been amazing having Maria Grazia Chiuri there – I feel like a woman knows what another woman wants to wear! And every time I’m in those dresses I feel exactly how I want to feel.”

Grazia Chiuri ignited discussion about feminism and gender politics in fashion when her debut collection for Dior included T-shirts proclaiming ‘We Should All Be Feminists’ – the title of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s book-essay. Portman, of course, applauded it.

“I almost cried when I saw her putting flats down the couture runway. I was like: ‘Yes!’” she says as she pumps her fist in a sign of empowerment. “She’s amazing and it’s been really fun – it’s also made me wear red lipstick a lot more in my real life. I don’t normally wear make-up but whenever I’m feeling bold, like I want to go in and get things done, I put on red lipstick and I’m ready.”

This article will appear in Vogue Australia’s April 2019 issue, on sale Monday, April 1.

Source: Vogue Australia

LOS ANGELES – In Vox Lux, Natalie Portman plays a girl who survives a school shooting, sings a song about it and becomes a huge pop star.

But as the movie attempts to dissect modern celebrity and violence, it left many moviegoers scratching their heads and critics rolling their eyes. And with a 60 per cent score on the website Rotten Tomatoes, it is one of Oscar winner Portman’s worst-reviewed films in years, although her performance received praise in some quarters.

At a screening in Hollywood last December (2018), the actress and the film’s writer-director, Brady Corbet, addressed the polarised reactions to their movie, which opens in Singapore on Feb 28.

Corbet, 30, says he set out to “make a movie that was about the early part of the 21st century”. And one of the defining characteristics of this century is “the spectacle of evil”, explains Portman, 37.

“In this century, the pageantry of evil is that violence has become theatre, violence has become about making a show – making the news and getting on TV. It’s all merging in this awful way,” she says.

“When I read (the script) it was like, wow, that’s something I hadn’t really thought about – the collision between pop culture and political life and violence.”

A story about a pop star captures the dark side of fame and pop culture in a way that an actor’s story could not, she believes.

“I think pop stars, unlike actors, are presenting a version of themselves, so there’s more at stake in terms of their fame, because we really see their personal relationships and ups and downs,” says the star, who won the Best Actress Oscar for the psychological drama Black Swan (2010).

“We see their art as a representation of their inner life, whereas for actors, we always see them as separate from their roles.”

Corbet says it is no coincidence the story starts in 1999, the year of the Columbine school shooting in Colorado as well as the height of singer Britney Spears’ fame.

“I’m from Colorado and I lived there when Columbine happened,” says the film-maker, who is also an actor from movies such as Funny Games (2007).

“It cast a shadow over the last 20 years in this country,” he says, noting the many school shootings that have followed. “I think it is one of the defining moments of our era.”

Asked about how the film has divided audiences, Corbet concedes “it is a very unusual film”.

“I think there are a lot of things you are not allowed to do (in films) – you are not allowed to have dramatic tonal shifts from melodrama to dark comedy and tragedy.

“But I believe in order for the film to be emblematic of the defining events of the 21st century, it had to be all of those things – equal parts absurdist and very serious.”

The film opens with a shooting and concludes with a pop concert.

While acknowledging it is a “difficult pitch”, he adds: “But I think the juxtaposition of the two exists in the culture and news cycle already. And with the convergence of pop culture and policy, I felt it was important to make a movie this way.”

Corbet calls it an ambitious experiment and is glad that people have shown up to watch it.

“Even if people really don’t like the film, I’m really thankful they spent two hours with it because it is very unusual. So I hope the whole thing opens a viewer’s mind, or a part of it does. That’s the best you can do.”

Portman sees similarities between Vox Lux and her Oscar-winning film Black Swan, in that “both have an interest in performance and what it means to be someone who has a performative self versus a private self, and what that means”.

She was also drawn to the larger-than-life character she plays, Celeste, and the “incredible dialogue that Brady wrote” for her.

“It’s so extravagant, the stuff she says. It’s like nonsense to real insight and back to this garbage – she’s just all over the joint,” the actress says. “And goes from being all pretence to a moment of being genuine.

“It was really fun to get to play with it.”

Vox Lux opens Feb 28.

Source: The Straits Times

NATALIE Portman sets pulses racing as she strips down to a black bra in new movie Vox Lux.

The Oscar-winning actress, 37, sizzles in a sexy dressing room scene as she portrays eccentric pop diva Celeste in the psychodrama.

The star also goes full on Lady Gaga in a crystal-encrusted catsuit while delivering a show-stopping concert.

Proving herself to be quite the triple threat, Natalie also sings and dances in the movie.

Some of the moves are even the work of her long-time choreographer husband Benjamin Millepied.

Vox Lux follows the rise of Celeste from the ashes of a major national tragedy to pop superstardom.

The movie spans across 18 years, starting from when Celeste is a teenager caught up in a school shooting.

After singing an original song inspired by the event at a memorial service, her talent is quickly spotted by music execs and she becomes the next music sensation – but fame isn’t without its pitfalls.

Jude Law also stars as Celeste’s manager, while Willem Dafoe narrates the movie.

The soundtrack also boasts original songs written by Grammy-nominated artist Sia.

Rooney Mara was booked to play Celeste in September 2016 but was replaced by Natalie in January 2018.

Speaking ahead of Vox Lux’s release, Natalie said of the her latest role: “I like that she’s not like a tragic victim.

“She’s certainly a party to her own devouring. She’s both on the receiving end of destruction and also a destroyer herself. [The movie] takes a pretty dark view of the effects of fame, for sure.”

Source: The Sun

What is the price of success? This age-old question is one of the themes in this grandiose and portentous pop star fable starring Natalie Portman and Jude Law.

Written and directed by actor-turned-filmmaker Brady Corbet, whose debut The Childhood of a Leader was a sinister period nightmare awarded best director and best first feature at Venice in 2015, Vox Lux bears some resemblance to Bradley Cooper’s A Star is Born — although twice as ambitious.

Cooper, after all, was not trying to talk about modern-day terrorism and the death throes of Western consumerism — just the loneliness of life at the top.

Corbet’s film is altogether more far-reaching.

While Childhood of a Leader was about characters bearing witness to some of the most disastrous moments of the early 20th century, Vox Lux is the same idea applied to our own era.

It begins with a “Prologue” title card, accompanied by ominous strings and Willem Dafoe’s voice-over introducing the protagonist, who we see in pastel home-video footage as a girl performing in a lounge room with a Christmas tree.

This is Celeste, and you’re made to understand trouble awaits her.

Corbet propels us next into a high school massacre — with jarring edits and unflinching violence — after which 14-year-old Celeste ends up with a bullet in her spine.

It’s the kind of shocking opening — misanthropic and coolly distant — that reminds you of a 21st-century Lars Von Trier (Dafoe’s narration underscores the impression).

Two more title cards, sectioning the film with biblical self-importance, “Genesis” and “Regenesis”, further cement this comparison.

The doe-eyed, pale-skinned Raffey Cassidy (The Killing of a Sacred Deer) plays Celeste in the first act, set in the late 1990s. She’s a suburban girl with a beautiful voice who’s catapulted to fame after a song she writes about the shooting with her sister (Stacy Martin) becomes a national hit, channelling the nation’s grief.

Jude Law plays her manager, the best character in the film, transforming from a strictly-business chaperone in the first half to an altogether more blurry manager/confidante in the second.

As an adult Celeste is played by Portman, an otherworldly beauty whose glamour is offset by a bratty, almost Jersey Shore vulgarity. In this section Cassidy plays her disaffected teen daughter.

Told with the right psychological nuance, this has the makings of quite a film.

But it’s clear Corbet has more on his mind than Celeste’s personal woes alone, and he pivots the story on the 9/11 attacks, whose aftershocks ricochet through his protagonist’s life in obviously symbolic ways.

Celeste goes from a fresh-faced teenager who’s a lightning rod for national pain, to a woman with a resentful streak, widely regarded with suspicion by the once-adoring public.

It’s a strange meld of macro and micro storytelling, in which Corbet is interrogating the act of myth-making — and how the news cycle turns on its heroes — while also asking questions about how America changed in the wake of 9/11.

He throws a tabloid scandal and another terrorist attack into the mix. Suddenly, Celeste has a PR crisis on her hands.

“I used to be treated like I was a hero,” complains Portman, with a similar anguish to her psychologically imploding ballet dancer in Black Swan.

On the eve of her character’s comeback tour for her new album, events conspire to derail her.

If you’re not quite sure what the film is saying, rest assured there are song lyrics to tell you. “I’m a private girl in a public world,” Celeste sings during the movie’s dreadfully shot concert finale (apparently real-life pop star Sia wrote material for the soundtrack, so not sure how this clanger made it through).

It’s a pity Corbet couldn’t dramatise this story of trauma and fame’s double-edged sword with more subtlety.

Portman, who gets an executive producer credit along with Law, is not the most multifaceted performer, and her part has been written in a way that’s mostly reactive, with not a lot to signal what’s going on beneath the surface. Corbet pushes some of Celeste’s most interesting dramas off screen, to be recounted in Dafoe’s gravelly narration, and we are left to fill in the gaps in her relationships with her family, manager and fans.

What does play out on screen is an interesting but never remarkable backstage drama in which Celeste and her manager try to manage family rifts, grapple with the media, get high and stagger to the gig.

The film’s central reference to 9/11 — and Celeste’s role as a symbol of American victimhood and exceptionalism — remains frustratingly underdeveloped, and sometimes banal.

Corbet’s film lacks the poetry or breathing space to make his statement more eloquently (a far superior film about consumerism, terrorism and youth culture is Nocturama, on Netflix). By the time his heroine is belting out her third-rate songs in a sequined jumpsuit, you can’t help but wish you’d stayed home.

Vox Lux is in cinemas from February 21.

Source: ABC News

“Pop stars are just so much more famous than actors,” says Natalie Portman. “It’s a different level of fame – of not being able to go anywhere and have people treat you like a regular person.”

We mere mortals might imagine Oscar-winning movie stars inhabit roughly the same exalted plane as chart-topping singers, but Portman insists not.

“The majority of my day is spent with people who have no idea who I am,” she says. “There are many places I go where I am just treated like another human being, and that’s the best thing. To have a kind, anonymous interaction with a stranger is the thing that gives you hope around humanity.”

Portman is expounding on the differences between these respective types of celebrity because in her latest film, Vox Lux, she plays a former teen pop star on the comeback trail.

“The opportunity to play a pop star was so fun,” she says of the film, which is part A Star is Born and part Bowling for Colombine.

It starts with a schoolroom massacre and ends with 15 minutes or so of concert footage, in which Portman’s single-name pop star Celeste struts her stuff in leotard and glitter make-up, flanked by dancers and singing her heart out.

Over a day and a half of shooting, they repeatedly filmed the entire concert scene, just down the road from her childhood home in Long Island. “We did it a lot, the whole 12 or 15 minutes of dancing, singing, everything together,” she says. “It was really hard but fun. I felt my age for sure.”

We first meet Celeste as a 13-year-old high-school student. She emerges from the shooting with a bullet permanently lodged in her spine and an urge to put her feelings about the situation into song, helped by her older sister Eleanor (Stacy Martin).

When she sings the song at a memorial service, she seems to encapsulate the nation’s grief. Soon, she’s signed to a record label, has a manager (Jude Law), and is on her way to being reshaped as a viable pop product.

The young Celeste is played by Raffey Cassidy, who resurfaces in the second half of the film, set 18 years later, as Albertine, daughter of the grown-up – and thoroughly messed-up – Celeste (Portman).

While Stacy Martin and Jude Law play the younger and older versions of their characters, Portman says writer-director Brady Corbet had two different actors play Celeste because he wanted to show how the music industry can take a person and transform them “into this whole different human being … [who] turns into this creation, a kind of monster”.

Did that aspect of the story have special resonance for Portman, who burst into the public eye as a 12-year-old in Luc Besson’s hitman drama Leon? After all, she has spoken recently about her experience of being exposed to the industry’s sexualisation of young women at such a tender age, and of receiving rape fantasy “fan mail” as a 13-year-old.

“I hope I’m not very similar to Celeste,” she says with a laugh. “I don’t feel very similar to her in my real life. And also I think the pop music and acting worlds are quite different.

“In pop you have this persona who is sort of an extension of your own personality, and in acting you’re really supposed to be very different. You’re more commended if you transform from what people perceive to be your real personality.”

Vox Lux is on limited release from Thursday February 21.

Source: The Sydney Morning Herald

“In the Envelope: An Awards Podcast” features intimate interviews with award-winning actors and other creatives. Join host and Awards Editor Jack Smart for a front row seat to the industry’s most exciting awards races, and valuable acting and career advice from contenders!

Today’s award-winning “In the Envelope” podcast guest needs no introduction, but we’ll try to give her one anyway.

Actor, producer, director, and activist Natalie Portman is one of Hollywood’s brightest talents. Born in Jerusalem, Israel, and raised in Long Island, New York, she burst onto the scene as a pre-teen in “Léon: The Professional” (after understudying in the Off-Broadway musical “Ruthless!”) and began relentlessly pursuing a life in the arts. As she tells Backstage, “when you’re that age, there’s just a pure love for what you’re doing…. If you’re an adult and wondering where your passion lies, think about what you loved when you were 11 years old.”

At the same time, however, Portman and her parents were sure to balance academics with what became a skyrocketing film career (she has famously said, “I’d rather be smart than a movie star”). While attending Harvard University, she used her summer breaks to star as Padmé Amidala in the “Star Wars” prequel trilogy and work with Mike Nichols onstage after he saw her on Broadway in “The Diary of Anne Frank.” She then began captivating audiences, critics, and awards voters with her choices on camera; “Garden State,” her Oscar-nominated “Closer,” “V for Vendetta,” her Oscar-winning “Black Swan,” the “Thor” films, her directorial debut “A Tale of Love and Darkness,” her Oscar and SAG-nominated “Jackie,” and many more projects that have defied expectations at every turn.

Last year proved to be another fascinating chapter in Portman’s filmography. In writer-director Alex Garland’s Paramount Pictures sci-fi thriller “Annihilation,” she delved into extraterrestrial, psychological nuance alongside Gina Rodriguez, Tessa Thompson, and Jennifer Jason Leigh. And in actor-turned-director Brady Corbet’s NEON drama “Vox Lux,” she played an explosive, damaged pop star opposite Jude Law and Raffey Cassidy. In this interview, Portman reveals the many factors that go into choosing and preparing for such roles, and discusses her veganism and advocacy work, particularly for the growing #TimesUp movement. (To donate to their legal defense fund, click here.) Also, if your audition game isn’t strong, you’ll want to hear how many jobs she’s booked through auditioning.

Source: Backstage

For costume designer Keri Langerman, the intrepid Vox Lux was an “incredibly interesting” project to take on, that could be “incredibly intimidating” in equal part. Defying categorization by genre and not easily captured in a log line, the Neon drama follows Celeste (Raffey Cassidy, and later, Natalie Portman), an ordinary teenager who survives a school shooting in 1999. From this moment, she is never the same, going on to become a pop star whose anthems dominate the airwaves, reshaping tragedy and trauma into artistic expression for the masses.

With its younger and older versions of Celeste, the film pointedly critiques the world of today, setting up an expanded timeline, and playing with form throughout to chart one uniquely talented woman’s metamorphosis. Prior to Vox, Langerman had never worked with it visionary director, Brady Corbet, at least in this context. For her, the extent of Corbet’s confidence, and his willingness to experiment, could be daunting, as she learned to work in new ways. “There were definitely points throughout the film where I questioned my ability to keep up with Brady, because he’s, in my mind, a genius,” she says. “I was in a constant state of making sure whatever I was putting forth was the absolute best version, because that’s what he was doing.”

Starting out on the project with total commitment, the costume designer avoided looking at any one pop star as an exact model for Celeste, turning to unusual sources for inspiration. Finding her ultimate test in Celeste’s stage performance that closes the film, Langerman got creative throughout the entire process, sourcing just the right fashions for a cast that included Jude Law, Stacy Martin, Jennifer Ehle, Christopher Abbott, and Cassidy, in dual roles. For Portman, an advocate for animal rights, she sought out vegan-friendly clothing, and in doing so, considered changing her process forever.

How did you come to work on Vox Lux?

I had seen that the film had gotten green lit, and my agent had told me about it because I had worked with Brady as an actor. I’d also designed one of his wife’s movies 4 or 5 years ago, but I didn’t want to use any preexisting relationships to try to award myself a job. So, I submitted what I thought would be a design proposal through my agency, and within a few hours of receiving it, Brady texted me, “You’re crazy, you should have just emailed this to me. It’s amazing; let’s work together.” There were some other people in the mix perhaps, but in the end it just clicked. We were speaking each other’s language. I knew I wanted to do this film based on Brady. I’d seen Childhood of a Leader, I love his wife Mona [Fastvold], and I loved his work as an actor, and the synopsis, so I was all in. And then when I read the script, it blew my mind. The way he writes, you can absolutely feel the aesthetic, the amount of direction and emotion, and all these things that are so tangible.

When I’d finished reading the script, I redesigned a design board and sent it to him, and the project stopped and started quite a bit. But we just kept working together throughout the year until production came up. We had a lot of time to ruminate over things, so that when the time came to go into pre-pro with just four weeks, he and I already had an understanding of where we wanted to go.

What did your design proposal entail?

I had a lot of focus on both Act One and Act Two. It was a very obvious thing that Act Two was going to be every costume designer’s dream of the big stage performance. It had a lot of drama to it, but I wanted to make sure that I was focusing on both [parts], with the same amount of excitement and attention to detail. I think I made 50 different versions of [this conceptual layout] by the time we went to share boards with the production crew. But for the first one, I tried to take his script and block it out every 10 to 15 pages, with mood boards that recapped what the script was doing, so he could see the design in a timeline.

It was a lot of historical references. Of course, I researched school shootings, and pop stars, and all that stuff. But I knew looking at too many actual pop stars, it would be super easy to let them influence the way I was going to dress Celeste. I wanted her to feel like her own person, specific to this film and the world that he was building, not a replica of someone who is out there right now performing music.

What kinds of materials proved most useful in getting to the essence of this character?

For this, I really tried not to look at people, but I looked at a lot at architecture. Brady has this futuristic sci-fi aesthetic in this film, and I wanted to look at architecture that mirrored that thing. So with Celeste, [and] her cape, I think I was looking at the new World Trade Center, at the sharp points. I wanted to make sure that I was getting inspiration from things that were not necessarily stage costumes, so that I could really feel like the process was going to be pure, and that the product would be original in that way.

Of course, I did look at people, too. I wanted to mainly make sure I was looking at that for structural inspiration, but I did look at some pop icons from mostly the late ’70s, early ’80s, and I tried to focus on pop stars in the very beginning of their careers. I think that’s a really interesting time: They don’t have a lot of money, they don’t have stylists; they don’t have people curating their every look.From the get-go, Brady and I knew that this was not going to be a movie where we wanted fashion speaking louder than the character, or a perfect, polished image that we were going to put forth. I really felt like Debbie Harry, David Bowie, Kim Gordon, this type of aesthetic…If we could roll these people into one person, and look at them in the early stages of their career, and how they chose to dress themselves, there was really something there.

Could you elaborate on the visual arc you constructed for Celeste over the course of the film?

I always wanted to make sure that Act One Celeste and Act Two Celeste felt like the same person, and I think a big part of her style journey was her neck coverings. When I read the script, I knew we were going to have to be covering that, and I wanted to use that as something that could evolve throughout her age and career, but then also be distinct enough that we can look at an image from different points in time, and know it’s the same character.

We decided pretty early on that it wasn’t going to look like jewelry in the traditional sense; I wanted it to feel a bit medical or practical, in a way that showed that it was something that she was using to close herself off, and protect herself from the outside world. It was something that a lot of the design for her character was centered on, and it’s the cut of her shirts, and jackets, and her stage costume as well. I tried to make sure that I wasn’t just doing a bunch of necklaces; that we would do clothing that would come up high, and chokers, or metal, or different materials, so that it felt like a natural choice.

In Vox Lux, Raffey Cassidy plays dual roles—as young Celeste, and later, as the pop star’s daughter, Albertine. How did you work through the challenge of visually differentiating an actress for dual roles?

Obviously, I was aware that it was the same person, but I tried to approach it first like they were two different actors, so that I could make sure I could see each actor in their truest light. Then, after designing both characters, pretending like they were going to be played by two completely different people, it was more technical. “Oh, let’s make the pant legs skinnier here.” In Act One, she’s got more of a flared bootleg ’90s cut, and then in Act Two, it’s a very skinny, straight leg jean. So it was things like that, where you have to be specific and period-correct, complementing the body. I knew with Act Two, we were going to be able to see her neck, and all these things that we never saw in Act One. So, I felt like it was going to do the job itself, and all I had to do was make sure to be aware of, and pay attention to that, and not get in the way of that character too much.

How much of your wardrobe for this film was sourced? When you sourced, what resources did you turn to?

Most everything was sourced, except for Natalie’s stage costume, and her backup dancer costumes. A lot of her costumes were sourced and tweaked because we didn’t want to use animal products on Natalie. For the purple leather jacket, we bought a vegan-friendly jacket, and we had to paint a couple different versions of it, to get it that purple that I wanted. Because we couldn’t just go into a store and buy a purple, vegan leather jacket that was going to work on camera, in the exact shade that we needed it to.

The same with her stage costume, and the backup dancers. I had designed this costume over and over, trying to figure out where the perfect place was to build something that was both iconic and simple, intricate and sophisticated. Once we figured out that it was going to be a catsuit, my anxiety came with not knowing if I was going to be able to pull that off, technically, so we hired LaQuan Smith, an incredible fashion designer. I showed him my sketches, and said, “I know you are your own fashion designer, but can you help me with this? Because I know that you can do this silhouette.”

[Because we were] doing an independent film, we didn’t have a full-time tailor, or any of those things. We were scrapping around, and I knew that this was a place where I needed someone who knew how to do something like this, and had done it a million times over. Because we had one shot. A lot of times, we’ll get to build a muslin, and we’ll get to fit it, but the first one we built was the one she ended up wearing. We had to alter it a lot, but we got one chance at it, and that was it.

The vegan things that I did end up getting for her were from Blank NYC. The jackets were from Blank, and the jeans were from R13. I had a lot of great people who wanted to be involved, and I’m very wary of product placement relationships, because I think a lot of times they can feel maybe not as genuine as a designer would like them to be. But I think it was challenging also because [given] the synopsis of the film, a lot of people didn’t know if they wanted to be involved. It was a risk; this is a completely original story, with an interesting log line, so it was about finding the right people.

For Jude Law, actually, I got an amazing amount of support. I knew from the beginning that we wanted to do a monochromatic look for him, and we tried on a couple different things. His jacket came from Valstar, which was made in Italy and feels like butter. They actually gifted that to us for free, which is super rare these days, and my gratitude was beyond words. It saved our budget, saved the film. Then, his pants, we had made in Italy, as well. I just really love Italian tailoring for men, and they were from Eidos. His gray turtleneck, we got as well from the UK, from a company called Enlist, so we had those items, and because he wore that outfit for days and days, we had two of them, so we could switch them out. All of Jude’s Act One stuff was sourced from thrift stores. I had never worked with Jude, so I wasn’t sure how he was going to feel about wearing $2 jeans, but he loved it—which was a relief, because you have your vision, the director has their vision, and you just don’t know until you meet the actor how they’re going to feel about that.

Then, Raffey and Stacy, a lot of those were just sourcing. Definitely Act One was all about thrift store shopping. I made sure to go Long Island thrift stores, to find ’90s, ’80s clothing. The characters are from Long Island, so it just wasn’t going to work for me to go into some thrift store in New York City, or upstate New York. I wanted to do what I could to again, get these pieces from a place of authenticity.

To your knowledge, does Portman always ask for vegan-friendly clothing in her projects? She recently narrated and produced a documentary called Eating Animals, examining our dietary choices and the consequences therein, so her concern and love for animals is clear.

I’m not sure about her other films, but we had a conversation about a week before she came to New York to do her fitting, and she had just brought it up, in a very casual manner. “Is it possible if we could just not use animal products for my costumes?” And I said, “Absolutely.” I worked with Rooney Mara on a project, and had done that with her, and it’s something that I’m fully behind. It actually makes me wonder if I could do this with more, if not every project, because it is a senseless use of an animal, when you can get a cinematic, stunning movie without that. I really admired that she had her morals, and she wanted to stick to them, but it wasn’t something that she felt she needed to impose on people in an aggressive way. It just felt really natural, and when she asked, it was super easy, and we did it. I don’t think it was any harder; it was just a different way of doing costumes.

Source: Deadline